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New Year’s Resolutions

Pastor Nirmala Reinschmidt
Interim Pastor

“I never make New Year’s resolutions, anymore,” the man told me, “I never keep them, anyway.” But I believe New year’s resolutions are worth making.

Let me tell you why.

First, we all need changes. Some we find very hard to admit to ourselves. There is great power in confession—to ourselves, to God, to others. Owning our failures is the first, painful step on the road to something better.

Second, when we change our calendar is a good time for reassessment. How did last year go? What do we want to do differently this year? Let us ask us a serious question. What percentage of our life is producing something value to God? How much “unplowed ground” do we have that ought to be broken up in this coming year and made useful? Reassessment.

Third, New Year’s is an excellent time for mid-course corrections. Sure, we might fail in what we set out to do, but if we fail to plan, the old saying goes, then we plan to fail. Failure is not the end. For the person who determines to learn from it, failure is a friend.

One of my heroes in the Bible is the Apostle Paul. Talk about failure! Throughout his life he was opposed, persecuted, shipwrecked, stoned and left for dead, slandered, and scorned. But during his life in prison he wrote, “Forgetting what is behind, and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus (Phil.3:13-14). Paul did not let the fear of failure keep him from trying again.

Fourth, the new year is a time to learn to rely more heavily on the grace God. One more secret from the Apostle Paul: “I can do everything through Him who gives me strength,” he said (Phil. 4:13). And God’s strength saw him through pain, through joy, and through accomplishment. Let us rely on God who is our refuge and strength.

May the grace of God abide with you and carry you through this new year.

Peace and Joy!

Well Trained & Alert

Pastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

For twenty-three years, beginning in 1990, I served as a chaplain in the Montana Air National Guard. The first two years of service were during the “Cold War.” The perceived threat, in those days, was that the Warsaw Pact countries, led by the Soviet Union, would attack one or more NATO countries, allied with the US. World War III would presumably start with a swift Warsaw Pact invasion of West Germany, Denmark, The Netherlands, and Belgium, to deny a landing point for NATO allies. This conventional warfare was expected to be short lived, for neither side wanted to be the last to deploy the inevitable nuclear weapons.

As a squadron of fighter jets, our basic mission was to “Survive, Fight, Win.” Surviving a direct nuclear strike, for obvious reasons never came up in our training. We, who were, “non-essential,” to the fight spent the better part of most exercises sheltering against radioactive fallout. We sat, and sat — reading books, watching movies, and struggling to imagine that anything like this could ever happen. Such a war could scarcely be imagined. With the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Cold War was declared to be over, and talk was of a “peace dividend.” How would we spend all of the money we would save, by not preparing for war? Now we had only to worry about “rogue nations,” and terrorist groups. In 1993 there was an unsuccessful attempt to bring down the World Trade Center with a truck bomb. We felt relieved at the relatively few casualties, and the minor damage done to the building, but we were warned to be alert.

Then came September 11, 2001, as another “day that will live in infamy.” Now, we lined up the troops for a no-kidding war. It was my job to brief the troops and their families on the cultural and religious differences between the US and the Middle East, and praying for their safe return. I remember thinking, with a lump in my throat, as families were divided in tearful goodbyes, “So this is what we have been training for all of these years. I pray we have trained them well.”

The key words for Advent season, will be, “Stay Awake, Watch, and Pray”…”So that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ (1 Cor. 1:7). “Therefore, keep awake — for you do not know when the master of the house will come, in the evening, or at midnight, or at cockcrow, or at dawn, or else he may find you asleep when he comes suddenly, and what I say to you I say to all: Keep awake” (Mark 13:35-37).

Have a blessed Advent season and a merry Christmas.

Giving Thanks

Pastor Nirmala Reinschmidt
Interim Pastor

Thanksgiving holiday is upon us. Judging by the holiday’s name, the way to celebrate Thanksgiving seems pretty straightforward: What could be simpler than counting your blessings and saying a prayer of thanks for them.

  • But the beauty and simplicity of the day have, for many, become complicated by a host of things that divert attention from the object of our gratitude: ìThe Lord.î Expressing thanks can be difficult when our mind is preoccupied with expectations (our own as well as others’), a loved one isn’t there to celebrate with us, or for some it is a high stress occasion.
  • The truth is, on a day set aside for being grateful, many people feel miserable. In fact, Christians are no exception. However, regardless of our feelings, the Bible tells us to constantly give thanks to the Lord.
  • “Rejoice always; pray without ceasing; in everything give thanks, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus” (1 Thessalonians 5:16-18)
  • Two reasons many of us don’t get the principle of thanksgiving right are somewhat opposite to each other.
    • We give thanks only for the things we feel thankful for.
    • We speak words of thanksgiving out of habit without truly grateful.

In the first case, we fall short of the goal laid out for us in God’s word — namely, to give thanks in everything. In the second case, we’re behaving religiously on the outside without being transformed on the inside. Instead of giving the Lord our gratitude, we are offering Him platitudes.

It is easy to be grateful when things are going well. What about the times when we feel that our life is falling apart? God want us to give thanks at all times, because He has a purpose for thankfulness. When we are thankful, we become more aware of His presence and more motivated to find His purpose. Thankfulness teaches us to trust God, build our faith, and recognize our dependence upon Him.

Count your Blessings! Be Thankful! Be generous!

Expect Positive Change

Pastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

I wish all of you could know the amount and quality of time and work your Transition Team has put in, and how rewarding it has been. The Transition Team is a group of eight specially chosen members, plus myself. They were assigned by the congregation council with five developmental tasks to help our congregation renew, refresh and plan for the future. We are intentionally taking some significant time to assure that your congregation has a clear sense of mission and direction, in order to attract and call a pastor with the commensurate skills to lead you into to the future to which God is calling you.

Here are the five developmental tasks:

  1. Come to terms with the past of the congregation
  2. Discover a new identity
  3. Enable positive change in leadership
  4. Renew relationships with the Southeastern Minnesota Synod, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and other expressions of the wider Church of Christ.
  5. Commit to new directions in ministry.

The team members have, so far, put in more than two hours each week, reading, thinking, discussing, and wrestling with the tasks listed above. We only wish you could know how enlightening and rewarding it has been for us as a group. And there is so much more to do.

Right now the team is looking for effective and creative ways to engage you in that same conversation. The team is now planning small forums for as many groups as they can gather to share what they have learned and also listen to your reflections. Small blue flyer is available at worship services and at the welcome desk with very general bullet statements, to invite you into the conversation.Please take advantage of these group meetings, and invite team members to your groups.

Here are the names of Transition Team members:

  • Dick Buckwalter
  • Marlo Bungum
  • Madi Flickinger
  • Nancy Johnson
  • Jen Smith
  • Tim Tjosaas
  • Jodie Tvedt
  • Ariana Wright
  • Pastor John Allen

Thank you

Pastor Nirmala Reinschmidt
Interim Pastor

Thank you so much for your care and prayers sent to us through sympathy cards and memorials. It truly brought us comfort and consolation. Please continue to keep us in your prayers as we mourn.

Pastor Nirmala’s father passed away August 13. She spent three weeks in India with her family, but she is back in the office now.

What can congregational leadership look like today?

John Allen 4 webPastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

The congregation in which I grew up had one pastor who did virtually everything. Thank goodness he almost always had a stay-at-home wife, who did virtually everything else. He did almost all the teaching of adults. He taught confirmation for seventh and eighth grade students. He also taught confirmation to any new initiates to the Lutheran faith. Lay adults could teach Sunday school and vacation Bible school, with supervision by the pastor. The pastor was either the president of the council, or approved most or all the action.

High school youth group or “Luther League” was organized like most groups of the congregation: by electing a president, vice president and secretary. Regular meetings were held and notes were taken. Dues were accepted from members to cover any expenses of the group. Besides Bible studies, regular outings, or service activities were planned at the meetings. Car washes were a regular form of fund raising. Outings were chaperoned by adult volunteers. The pastor was nearly always present at Luther League meeting and outings. When the congregation grew too large for one pastor (usually due to worship size and building capacity), the solution was simply to add another pastor—usually a younger one, to help manage youth ministry. Worship was very traditional and uniform with little variation between one service and another.

I suspect these “pastor centric” congregations were a product of a time when pastors, lawyers, and doctors were virtually the only members of the community educated beyond high school, let alone college. It’s not surprising that, with the prevalence of college educated adults, church leadership and activity has evolved to include male and female pastors, lay professionals, and volunteers in the leadership roles. People have also come to expect a wide selection of things and activities. Adults and young people are no longer content with a single option—whether it be with worship or any other activity.

That being said, it’s surprising how many congregations want to call a pastor who can do all and be all in the congregation. Expecting leadership to come almost exclusively from one person “at the top,” is a recipe for confusion and dysfunction. The larger the congregation grows, the more it should, and can, rely on a variety of leaders with a broad range of skills. Though it may still be wise to have a trained theologian and skilled administrator to be the key leader of a large congregation, there are many levels of leadership and responsibility that allow for the variety of programing beyond what any one person can lead and be involved in.

Congregational councils are wise not to try to manage all of committee or commission activities. Appoint skilled leaders at all levels and divisions of church work. Give them the freedom to operate within guidelines established by the leadership and approved by the congregation. Let the council be occupied with the vision and general direction of the congregation and God’s mission. Let the congregation seek to call a lead pastor with good management and people skills and a vision of the future development of the congregation. Let the congregation be committed to prayer and discernment of God’s work. Let them be committed to a common vision and strong support of all leadership throughout the congregation and the wider church. And let the glory belong to God alone.

Vacation with Jesus

NirmalaReinschmidt2017webPastor Nirmala Reinschmidt
Interim Pastor

Summer time is a wonderful time of the year! The days are warmer and most of us take time off to go on vacation. Many like to go camping and fishing and others enjoy going to a different city to visit friends and families.

Who do you vacation with? Do you take best friend along with you? Do you spend time with Jesus in the summer? Many Christians find it very easy not to think much about Jesus all summer long. Many don’t attend worship as much, and some don’t come at all. Where are these people? Often they are out trying to have fun on their own without Jesus.

A woman said to me once, “Pastor, don’t worry, when September comes I will come back to church. This is my vacation from church.” This woman did come back to church in September. However, she also said that she was lonely for Jesus and that it felt good to come to church again and hear Jesus speak to her there through scriptures, hymns and the sermons. Think of how much happier her life and her summer could have been if she had regularly heard the Lord speak to her through the Bible. How refreshed she would have been to worship with her fellow Christians all summer long. We are blessed to have churches throughout the nation and the world. When you go on vacation make effort to find a church and go there to be refreshed by the Word and Sacrament. If you won’t be near a church make sure that you take your Bible, hymnals and the devotional books along to read and sing along with your families and friends to worship and praise the Lord. Make it a point that you remember to begin the day with the Lord and with His word and end the day with the Lord and with His word. True rest and Peace comes from the Lord and through His word alone.

Remember that our Lord Jesus be with us at all times. He never takes time off including summer. So we too should never take time off from Him. Let us remember that by His grace and patience alone that we live. As Hebrews 10:25 says “Let us not give up the habit of meeting together, as some are doing, instead, let us encourage one another all the more, since you see the Lord is coming nearer”

May you all have a blessed summer!

vacation with jesus

The Face(s) of the Synod

John Allen 4 webPastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

Sitting in a session of Southeastern Minnesota Synod Assembly earlier this month, I kept thinking of that quote from the old Pogo comic series, “We have met the enemy—and they is us!” The synod is not the enemy, of course, but I’ve sure met congregational members who seem to think it is. Seven members of St. John’s attending that assembly have met the synod, and we know, “they is us.”

Our church, the ELCA, practices a participatory form of governance. We don’t have a top-down kind of authority that we often associate with other churches. We don’t have a pope, for instance. Our bishops and other leaders are elected by us to administer the ministries that we, as congregations have chosen to share. We can use the word “synod” to refer to the bishop’s office, or the synod office, but when we speak of what the synod does, “they is us.”

At the assembly, we saw the face (or faces) of the synod at work. We met at the Civic Center in Rochester, together with some three or four hundred representatives of local congregations of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), to listen, worship, learn, talk, share, compare…and elect. Some members came from small struggling congregations. Others came from large struggling congregations…and every configuration in between. We heard some engaging preaching and Bible studies. And, as always among Lutherans, we heard some great music. Together, we shared our common desire to be the hands and voice of our Lord. We shared our common faith and hope. We shared concern for the challenges and barriers that make proclamation of the Gospel difficult in our time and age. We came to name our fears and challenges, and we came to pledge our commitment to one another and our Lord Jesus. So, next time you hear the word “synod,” or see it in our budget, think of all of the ministry, mission, and outreach that happens on our behalf.

Bare Necessities

john-allen-2-webPastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

At the age of 24, Apsley Cherry-Garrard was one of the youngest members of Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova expedition to Antarctica (1910-1913), in support of Scott’s dream of being the first to discover the South Pole. “Cherry” had lived a life of privilege and luxury. He fit well the description being “born with a silver spoon in his mouth.” But, there were no luxuries at all on this expedition. The men of the Terra Nova endured two winters of unimaginable hardship — living on the edge of survival. Strangely enough, Gerrard learned to appreciate the bare necessities of life. “The luxuries of civilization,” he wrote, “satisfy only those wants which they themselves create.”

During lent we are reminded of the luxuries we have and take for granted. These luxuries are not only habit forming, but they create a desire for more. The miracles of the smartphone we own make us wonder how much more awesome the next generation will be.  Lines form outside the Apple Store every time there is a new release, which we believe we can scarcely live without. Cherry Gerrard had to be removed from all of his luxuries before he appreciated the simple pleasures of existence. These forty days of life without some of the addictive luxuries of life might be enough to liberate us from the wants that our luxuries create.

Intro to the New Pastor

john-allen-2-webPastor John Allen
Interim Pastor

I’m happy to be with you as your interim Lead Pastor. I’ve had a few brief moments to share with you since I arrived here on December 18, driving from Great Falls, Montana, and dodging winter storms.

First, I want to thank Colleen Jacobson for housing me while we waited for a townhouse to be available, and then to all who helped move and provide furniture. My wife and I will be very comfortable there during our time here.

Now a little about myself and my family: Yes, Ruth and I currently own a home in Great Falls, MT, though we’ve spent more time recently in Minnesota. My most recent interim ministry was with Good Shepherd Lutheran in Rochester. We were there nearly two years and had a very positive and productive relationship with that congregation and staff. After a six-week rest at home, we are back and ready to start afresh with you.

While we were in Montana, Ruth’s 94-year-old mother suffered a broken thigh bone while in a nursing home in Kalispell, MT. We rushed there for the surgery, and Ruth has been with her since then. I look forward to the time when she can join me here. We have three grown children and three grandchildren, whom I hope you will meet in due time.

Please expect that this will be a longer and more productive interim than you have experienced in the past. While serving on your staff in ministry, I will be giving special attention to the leadership of the congregation as we tend to five developmental tasks of interim ministry. Namely: coming to terms with the past, exploring your identity and direction, making helpful leadership changes, renewing relationships with the larger church, and committing to new leadership and direction. That may sound technical, but we will be as open and cooperative as we can in this work, and I believe we will be happy with the results.

I but I look forward to our time together and ask your willing cooperation in the work that we have ahead. I’m happy to say that Pastor Nirmala has also agreed to stay on with us as part-time assistant pastor. She and I will work closely with the talented staff you already have in place.

john@stjohnskasson.org
cell (406) 590-2974

Room for Baby Jesus

nirmala-reinschmidt-2016-webPastor Nirmala Reinschmidt
Interim Pastor

“There was no room for them in the inn.” (Luke 2:7)

Once a school put on a Christmas program. The children were planning to enact a nativity scene. Parents were invited to watch the program. All the preparations were made for the program to start. At that time a 4th grade boy went near the manger and was peeping into the manger again and again. One of the teachers noticed and asked the boy the reason for doing that. The boy replied that they forgot to put the baby doll in the manger. The teacher realized her mistake, thanked him for noticing, and put a doll in the manger. The play began.

In the midst of all our preparations we tend to forget the real hero of Christmas celebration. We are occupied with other activities, which prevent us from giving importance to Jesus. He is the reason for the season. Jesus is left out of our celebration. Yes! There is no room for Jesus.

Jesus came into the world and died in order to make room for us in heaven. Let’s remember to make room for Jesus. Take time to share Christmas stories with the children so they know baby Jesus is the reason for the season not Santa Claus and the gifts. Advent devotional booklets are available to have family devotions during the month of December. Invite family and friends to attend the Advent and Christmas services to make the season a meaningful one.

Thanks again for your generosity to support the mission and ministries of St. John’s.  May you all have a blessed Christmas!

Final thoughts from Pastor Randy

RandyFettPastor Randy Fett
Lead Pastor

Friends,

“Peace I leave with you… Do not let your hearts be troubled, and neither let them be afraid… As the Father loves me, so I have loved you. Abide in my love… I have said these things to you so that my joy may be in you and your joy may be complete.” (John 14)

These are Jesus’ words to His disciples before his journey to the cross. May these words guide you in the days to come. They will be my prayer as I enter this time of discernment.

Confirmation day was Sunday, October 2, at the 10:15 am worship service. We are excited for the 33 students who affirmed the faith journey that began in Baptism. This is one of treasures of the church, one of the most important things that we do as a church. Budgetary needs for 2017 are prepared by our church’s commissions and committees in the month of October. It is also Lutefisk Dinner month. It has been fun to work with the lefse makers each week. I have gotten the hang of rolling and flipping. Last year my daughter in law learned how to bake lefse. I told her that we have a date this Fall to do this together.

Thank you for your faithfulness. May Jesus be your constant light. May you stay faithful? Keep the spiritual disciplines of faith alive. Worship regularly. May you continue to give of yourselves and your time and treasures. Give to the mission of Christ. May you continue to lift up the light of Christ so that we have a more enlightened world. Keep Christ at the center. Safeguard and protect the children. Tend to the needs of the world. Nurture the faith of all who have been baptized. Celebrate as couples exchange vows in marriage at the altar. Pray for those who have lost loved ones. Be the light.

Fall Start-Up

RandyFettPastor Randy Fett
Lead Pastor

Fall start up. Families are buying school supplies. Students have their class schedules. Fall sports have begun. Farmers are praying that frosts are delayed and they will have a full harvest. Families are spending their last days at on vacation. Things are gearing up for Fall. Some of us can hardly wait for the first kick off. Anticipation is building.

In churches, (and in the past here), we call the Sunday after Labor Day “Rally Sunday.” This year, St. John’s is calling it “Gods Work, Our Hands” day. We invite everyone to share in a very special day of service in connection with our worship on Sunday, September 11. This is a national and synod wide emphasis throughout the ELCA.

Worship time changes: Wednesday evening worship will change to 6:15 pm. We are trying this to accommodate families who desire to have their children home from the evening activities at an earlier time. Sundays will return to 8:00 am with Traditional style liturgy worship and 10:15 am with the Blended style worship.

Fall also includes the installation of our educators and volunteer leaders, the presentation of Third grade Bibles, and the wind up for our 9th grade confirmation class (33 students), who will be confirmed on Sunday October 2 at the 10:15 am worship service.

Lefse baking has started and plans are in motion for our annual Lutefisk supper in late October.  Visit http://stjohnskasson.org/lutefisk/ for details on lefse baking opportunities and the Lutefisk Dinner.

Thank you to all for your dedication to these significant missions and ministries of St. John’s. Your commitments are an inspiration to us all.

I have been thinking about how I might share a blessing each week with families. With each email response that I send out, I will share a special blessing from scripture and I will commit myself to pray for that special blessing on each of your homes. Think about how can you share a blessing with those around you. This is a call from our God. Let me begin with these words:

“O give thanks to the Lord of Lords, for he is good, who does great wonders. It is he who remembers us. O give thanks to the God of heaven for his steadfast love endures forever.” – inspired from Psalm 136. May this blessing be upon your home today.

God bless as we gear up for the fall, as we serve as God’s hands, as we begin anew with programming and ministries, and as we pray for those bountiful crops.

Reflecting on the first year, looking ahead to a great summer

Pastor Dana

Pastor Dana O’Brien
Associate Pastor

Pastor Dana O’Brien
Associate Pastor

It occurred to me the other day that I’ve been at St. John’s for just over a year. (I started in May 2015.) And I just want to thank you all for this last year. I know that lots of the stuff we tried was a bit different for many of you – certainly not something that you were used to – but you jumped in with both feet, often going well outside your comfort zones to try something new. You were even willing to humor me on some of those things you may have thought were really weird (watching movies in worship, for example).

I was particularly reminded of how great you all are last week. On Tuesday, we had our most recent ministry of encouragement (MOE) visit to the local elementary school. I had never done an MOE this big before – over 100 people – and I’ll admit I was a bit concerned about whether we could pull it off. But I needn’t have worried. On Tuesday morning we had about 15 people who came and set everything up with an efficiency that was pretty darn impressive. And then there was the food! Over 30 people prepared so much food that we filled up three tables, had some piled up under the tables and had to bring some back. God’s abundance reflected through the people of St. John’s!

And then on Wednesday, we had our first worship service in the park. Again, so many people stepped up to be involved. People brought food, helped set up (a special thanks to Terry Czeck for sharing his grilling skills), and then stayed to clean up afterward. If our first service was any indication, the kids will definitely be taking the lead. They participated in communion, in the bike blessing and singing, and they did a great job starting to fill our jar with stones as they shared places they saw God this last week.

Not to be outdone were all of you who worshipped Sunday morning. (It was so packed we almost ran out of bread for communion – a wonderful problem to have. C’mon, I challenge you – bring your friends and neighbors, so we have so many people we have to use two loaves on Sunday morning.) Anyway, not only did you show up big time on Sunday, but you also stayed for quite awhile to chat afterward – really nice.

I look forward to the remainder of the summer, with more Wednesday worship services, and more events to get us out of the building. We’ve got our Family Fun Night at the end of July (July 28) and we’ll also be in the park a couple of time with our free kids games. Food for Friends will also be continuing all summer long. And then there’s VBS, the youth trip to Philadelphia, confirmation camp and action camp in August . . .

It’s going to be a great summer!!

The New Life of Easter

RandyFettPastor Randy Fett
Lead Pastor

Christ is risen!
He is Risen Indeed!

With these words comes the challenge to embrace our lives with hope, faith, vitality, and life. Spring, the season of new life, is just around the corner. As is Easter. Easter is about the new life that comes from the risen Christ. In baptism we say that you and I went through a type of regeneration. Imagine the butterfly – the creature inside the cocoon emerges a new being, a beautiful butterfly, free to wander and fly.

Recently I completed training in a way of doing vision work called “Appreciative Inquiry.” I hope that this helps me be a better and more encouraging person and pastor. I hope that it helps our congregation. Often we get stuck in the negative doldrums of our lives. We can all be more affirming. This is about the affirmation and transformation that God has made in baptism. We emerge at Easter as new beings in Christ.

We were asked to walk with Jesus several times while I was taking this training. It was a time for silence, for listening for God’s direction. We were asked about God’s purpose for our lives, to discern in our souls where God was taking us, our ministries, and the church we serve. We were invited to close our eyes and to see an image of what God may be presenting. My image was a butterfly.

As we come through Lent, I invite you to lean forward to the resurrection, the new life that we have in Christ. Consider with me, what is you purpose in life? Where is God leading you? How might the butterfly be an image of hope for us in the coming season of Easter?

Join with us this month as we meet with Jesus, enter the streets of Jerusalem with Palm branches, eat supper with Jesus, and experience the sheer joy of his resurrection. Bring a friend. Tell the stories of your faith. Get out of the church walls. Jesus didn’t rise in the temple. He raised on the hills outside of the city walls.

Beautiful Blue Butterfly